Air Pollution Control Innovations

Refinery Catalyst Regeneration SO2 Scrubber

Posted by Andy Bartocci on Mon, Dec 16, 2019 @ 06:59 AM

A Saudi petrochemical plant operates a hydrogenation reactor to Refinery Catalyst Regen SO2 Scrubber renderingreduce organic compounds using a catalyst. In-situ regeneration is desired to restore the catalyst for additional processing. This improves operational efficiency and safety. The facility is evaluating technology options to achieve this goal. One approach is to
contact the catalyst with a carrier gas at elevated temperature to promote oxidation, resulting in SO2 emissions.

A wet scrubber is needed with this approach to remove SO2 before exhausting to atmosphere. The scrubber will be installed outdoors in a harsh coastal environment with summer temperatures exceeding 114oF. It will operate 3 to 5 days every 18 months and needs to be stored properly to maintain operational condition between uses.

The scrubber is to be built in conformance with over 12,000 pages of detailed refinery specifications with extensive quality assurance requirements.  Because of a tight schedule, a scrubber engineering order is initiated in parallel to evaluating other technology options. This reduces scrubber delivery time if the carrier gas oxidation approach is selected.

The customer selected an Envitech scrubber for the engineering order after extensive evaluation. The equipment scope includes a quencher, packed bed absorber, instruments, recirculation pump, pre-assembled piping, valves, and fittings with pre-mounted instruments. Pre-mounted instruments are pre-wired to control boxes. Components meet Class I, Div 2 area classification.

The quencher and vessel are designed using T316SS with internal and external coating. Piping Saudi refineryis T316SS conforming to ASME B31.1. Welds are specified to be magnetically and X-ray tested using certified welders.

The design submittal includes more than 90% of final engineering deliverables. The design order was complete and meets the design conditions outlined in the table below.

Although designed as stationary equipment, this type of scrubber can also be designed for mobility for use in other applications or acid gases. Alternate materials of construction are available such as FRP or alloy steels.

DESIGN PARAMETERS

  • Inlet flow rate: 3,200 acfm
  • Inlet temperature: 510oF
  • Carrier gas composition:  N2
  •  Inlet SO2: 64 lb/hr
  • Outlet SO2:  < 50 ppmv
Click on the link below to download a case study for a refinery catalyst regeneration SO2 scrubber and other scrubbing literature.

Download Literature

Topics: Scrubbers, Packed Bed Absorbers, Packed Bed Scrubbers, Wet Scrubbers

Mineral Processing Venturi Scrubber

Posted by Andy Bartocci on Wed, Dec 04, 2019 @ 08:04 AM

US Magnesium is implementing an electrolytic expansion project located in Rowley, UT. A scrubbing system isUS Mag Venturi Scrubber needed to remove particulate from a chlorine gas stream that originates in the anode compartments of electrolytic cells that produce magnesium metal. A significant portion of the particulate is less than 1 micron in size, making it difficult to remove.

Chlorine is an important by-product of the electrolytic process. Scrubbed chlorine flows to a chlorine plant for further processing and liquefaction. The scrubbing equipment must be designed and constructed in a manner to minimize air in-leakage and chlorine emissions. Materials of construction must be selected to withstand severe corrosive characteristics of > 90% chlorine (Cl2) gas.

Particulates in the gas leads to maintenance associated with downstream filters in the chlorine plant. It is therefore necessary to maximize removal efficiency to minimize filter maintenance costs.

The customer selected an Envitech high efficiency Venturi Scrubber. The equipment includes a fixed throat fiber reinforced plasUS Mag Venturi Scrubber Fanstic (FRP) Venturi scrubber and horizontal chevron style entrainment separator. Additional scope of supply includes instruments, pre-assembled pump skid with redundant titanium pumps (1 operating and 1 spare), pre-assembled CPVC piping, redundant fans with titanium wheel and housing, interconnect FRP ductwork, dampers, and equipment skid and platforms.

Because a large fraction of particulate is submicron in size and difficult to remove, the fans and vessels are designed to operate at -70” water column pressure drop.

An Envitech Venturi scrubber was installed on the original process in 1999. The new scrubber for the expansion project was installed in 2011. Both systems continue to operate with high reliability and uptime. The table below summarizes key design parameters for the new Venturi scrubber.

DESIGN PARAMETER

  • Inlet flow rate: 8,200 acfm
  • Inlet temperature: 130oF
  • Gas Composition:  > 90% Cl2 gas
  • Pressure drop: 60" W.C.
  • PM Removal: > 75%

Click on the link below to download a case study and other Venturi scrubbing literature.

Download Literature

Topics: particulate control, Venturi scrubbers, Scrubbers, Wet Scrubbers

Hot Mix Asphalt Dryer Emissions Control

Posted by Andy Olds on Wed, Dec 04, 2019 @ 06:30 AM

Hot mix asphalt (HMA) plants combine aggregate and petroleum byproducts to form paving material.  HMA plants can be permanent, transportable (skid-mounted), or portable.  For large asphalt projects, it is economical to use transportable or portable HMA plants so as to set up near the project and reduce the delivery time of asphalt to the site.  Large HMA manufacturers thus transport their manufacturing equipment from site to site.Env Horz VS scrub

The most common HMA plant is a batch mix plant.  A batch plant consists of an aggregate dryer to dewater the aggregate, a mixer to combine the aggregate with asphalt cement, and a load-out bay for transferring the final product to trucks for transport.  Auxiliary equipment includes a cyclone for aggregate collection after the dryer, a secondary collection device for particulate emissions, a blue haze control device to curb VOC emissions.  Reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) is typically used to reduce costs and promote sustainability within the industry.  The stage at which RAP is introduced depends on the qualities of the RAP and the desired properties of the final asphalt product.

According to the EPA, there are two primary techologies for the secondary collection devices: Venturi scrubbers and baghouses.  Venturi scrubbers are wet devices that capture particulate through inertial impaction.  Venturis are fractional efficiency devices capable of efficiently capturing particulate as small as 1 micron.  Venturis are inherently self cleaning: water sprays continuously from the Venturi throat and the accelerated gas shears any wall buildup.  Thus, Venturis are excellent in the removal of sticky particulate that would foul other forms of particulate control. Also, as a wet process, Venturis have the ability of capturing condensables and water soluble vapors.  The alternative technology for secondary particulate capture is a baghouse.  A baghouse achieves particle collection by filtering the gas through a physical barrier. Baghouses can efficiently remove submicron particulate, provided that the particulate is filterable.  Baghouses are not able to capture condensibles, but can capture some acid gases if an appropriate dry chemical is added to the dryer flue gas.

Recently, Envitech has developed an economical Venturi scrubber that can be either built on a skid for easy transport, or built on a truck bed for portability.  Envitech's Venturi scrubber is capable of meeting even the most stringent PM-10 requirements for particulate control, and works well with downstream blue haze control devices. Our Venturi scrubber is also anti-fouling and capable of consistently meeting control targets even with difficult RAP and exotic formulations with minimal maintenance.   

Topics: particulate control, Venturi scrubbers, Scrubbers

Wet Scrubber Basics

Posted by Andy Bartocci on Tue, Sep 10, 2019 @ 09:02 AM

 

As an equipment supplier of custom engineered wet scrubber equipment, Envitech frequently provides lunch and learns (L&L’s) to engineering companies to help educate engineers about the basics of available technology.

Figure 1 below is a summary chart of predominant wet scrubber technology options. The main product categories include packed bed absorbers, Venturi scrubbers, and wet electrostatic precipitators (WESPs). Each wet scrubber type serves a different purpose and is used in different circumstances. For instance, packed bed absorbers are primarily used to remove gaseous emissions like SO2, HCl, or HF. We often receive packed bed absorber inquiries for particulate removal, however, this would be a misuse of technology. Packed bed absorbers remove some particulate but they are not nearly as efficient as other options.

Figure 1: Wet scrubber technology summaryEnv wet scrubber technologies

Venturi scrubbers are used for particulate removal. Just like we sometimes receive packed bed absorber inquiries for particulate removal, we’ll occasionally get Venturi scrubber inquiries for acid gas removal. This would also be a misuse of technology. Venturi scrubbers achieve some acid gas removal, but they have poor mass transfer compared to a packed bed absorbers.  

Venturi scrubbers use mechanical forces to remove particulate. Particles are captured through a process of impaction between particles in the gas and water droplets in the Venturi throat. A high differential velocity is created between particles and droplets by accelerating the gas in the throat. A pressure drop in the throat provides energy to capture the particles. Smaller particles less than 1 micron in size avoid capture by behaving like gas molecules and finding slip streams around the water droplets. Venturi scrubber performance drops offs exponentially for submicron particulate. Overall removal efficiency may be limited for a gas stream with a high concentration of submicron particulate. Venturi scrubbers are a good choice for industrial dryers or other applications with large size particulate.

Wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP) are the third type of wet scrubber summarized in the table. Like Venturi scrubbers, they are also particulate removal devices. They differ from Venturi scrubbers in a couple of ways, 1.) electrical, not mechanical forces are used to capture particulate, and 2,) they are efficient at capturing submicron particulate. Figure 2 shows a performance comparison between a WESP and Venturi scrubber. It can be seen that performance drops off dramatically for Venturi scrubbers for particles less than 1 micron in size. WESP’s on the other hand remove particles regardless of particle size.

Figure 2: WESP, Venturi scrubber performance comparison versus particle size.

Envitech WESP Venturi Performance

The summary in Figure 1 also shows how each wet scrubber technology differs in regulatory control. A packed bed absorber is typically controlled for recirculation flow rate and liquid pH. A Venturi scrubber is controlled by recirculation rate and pressure drop. A WESP is controlled by voltage. Control limits are typically spelled out in the operating permit.

Finally, some examples of applications are given for each type of wet scrubber. It should be noted that there are many applications that have multiple types of pollutants. A hazardous waste incinerator, for instance, contains particulate, acid gases, and specific heavy metals like cadmium and lead. A fraction of particulate is submicron in size and difficult for a Venturi scrubber to remove. It is common for different types of wet scrubbers to be combined into a multi-pollutant device. Figure 3 shows a common arrangement for an incinerator scrubber. The gas is first cooled in a quencher. A packed bed absorber removes acid gases. A Venturi scrubber removes particulate and a WESP removes the submicron particulate and heavy metals.

Figure 3: Incinerator wet scrubber arrangement

Env wet scrubber arrangement

Wet scrubbers can also be combined with dry scrubbers in certain circumstances. An upstream bag-house can remove particulate followed by a packed bed absorber for acid gas removal. A cyclone can be used to knock out large particulate before using a Venturi scrubber for the remaining particulate. A cyclone helps to minimize blowdown and water consumption. In some cases, a dry filter or carbon bed absorber can be integrated downstream of a wet scrubber for mercury and/or dioxin/furan. Click here to read a blog piece about an example of a wet scrubber combined with a carbon bed.

This about covers wet scrubber basics. If you’re with an engineering company and want to discuss scheduling a lunch an learn, please give Envitech a call. You can click on the icon below for a set of Envitech brochures.

Click on the icon below to download an Envitech brochure.

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Topics: particulate control, Venturi scrubbers, Scrubbers, SO2 Scrubber, wet electrostatic precipitators, Acid Gas, Packed Bed Absorbers, Packed Bed Scrubbers, Wet Scrubbers

International Conference on Thermal Treatment Technologies and Hazardous Waste Combustors (IT3/HWC)

Posted by Andy Bartocci on Mon, Aug 26, 2019 @ 10:55 AM

IT3 Logo

Envitech will be attending and exhibiting at the 37th International Conference on Thermal Treatment Technologies and Hazardous Waste Combustors (IT3/HWC) in League City, TX on October 2nd and 3rd, 2019. If you happen to be attending the conference, please stop by the Envitech booth or find me at the conference to say hello.

Three keynote panels will include high level experts and cover hot topics in the industry:

  • PFAS Overview, Regulatory Approach, Testing and Destruction
  • Emerging Air Quality Monitoring
  • Lessons Learned from the United Kingdom's 2018 Novichok Nerve Agent Incident

Papers presented in technical sessions cover:

  • Technologies and Trends in Incineration
  • Plastics Recycle and Reuse
  • Emission Monitoring
  • Waste-to-energy, Emission Monitoring, Pyrolysis 

Envitech will present papers on the following two topics.

Technology Solutions for Sulfuric Acid Formation and Removal in Liquid Waste and Waste Gas Thermal Oxidizers

Petrochemical plants, refineries, and waste-oil re-refiners operate liquid waste or waste gas thermal oxidizers.Candle filter The thermal oxidizers need a wet scrubber to neutralize and remove SO2. Flue gas entering the scrubber contain some sulfur trioxide (SO3) which is converted to sulfuric acid (H2SO4) in the quencher. Sulfuric acid is a submicron liquid aerosol that passes through the downstream packed bed absorber. Some facilities are now being regulated for H2SO4. This paper evaluates and compares candle filters versus wet electrostatic precipitators (WESP’s) for H2SO4 removal in these applications.

Sewage Sludge Incinerator (SSI) Mercury Control Technologies

Mercury Control ScrubberWaste water treatment facilities operating sewage sludge incinerators (SSI) can reduce sludge volume and disposal costs by combusting dewatered sewage sludge. Emissions are regulated by the US EPA Maximum Available Control Technology (MACT) standard 40 CFR Part 60 and 62 to control particulate, lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), SO2, HCl, dioxins/furans, and mercury (Hg). Many SSI’s need a control device specifically for mercury. This paper evaluates two mercury control technologies: sulfur‐impregnated activated carbon and Gore sorbent polymer catalyst (SPC) modules. Several facilities have used sulfur-impregnated activated carbon but safety issues have arisen due to fires which have shut down some systems. The Gore SPC modules are a relatively new technology with at least seven installations. A comparison is made of capital cost, operating cost, mercury removal efficiency, fire and performance risks based on incineration of 3,000 lbs/hr of sewage sludge. Finally, an overview is provided for an Envitech SPC mercury control scrubber operating at one facility.

Click on the icon below to download an Envitech brochure.

Download Brochure

 

 

Topics: particulate control, Scrubbers, SO2 Scrubber, wet electrostatic precipitators, Acid Gas, Incinerator Scrubber, SO3 Aerosol

Technology Solutions for Sulfuric Acid Formation and Removal in Thermal Oxidizers

Posted by Andy Bartocci on Fri, Aug 23, 2019 @ 02:56 PM

Enivtech will be attending the 2019 International Conference on Thermal Treatment Technologies andCandle filter Hazardous Waste Combustors  (IT3/HWC)  October 2-3 in Houston, TX. A paper will be given on “Technology Solutions for Sulfuric Acid Formation and Removal in Liquid Waste and Waste Gas Thermal Oxidizers”. The paper is available for download by clicking the button at the bottom of this blog piece.

Petrochemical plants, refineries, and waste-oil re-refiners operate liquid waste or waste gas thermal oxidizers. The thermal oxidizers need a wet scrubber to neutralize and remove SO2. Flue gas entering the scrubber contains some sulfur trioxide (SO3) which is converted to sulfuric acid (H2SO4) in the presence of water vapor. Sulfuric acid is a submicron liquid aerosol that can pass through downstream equipment, such as a packed bed absorber or a baghouse. Some facilities are now being regulated for H2SO4.

WESPOver the last decade, Envitech has supplied SO2 scrubbers for thermal oxidizers burning sulfur containing compounds in refining applications. Most of these do not have add-on controls for capturing sulfuric acid mist. More recently, however, Envitech has supplied two systems with candle filters for the capture of sulfuric acid mist. Another known system used a wet electrostatic precipitator for the capture of sulfuric acid mist. A potential fourth system with a large gas flow rate with expected SO3 emissions was evaluated for a wet electrostatic precipitator.

A thermal oxidizer converts sulfur containing liquid or gaseous waste in the presence of excess oxygen to sulfur dioxide (SO2). A fraction of SO2 is further converted to SO3. The reaction is:

SO2 + 1/2O2 => SO3

The conversion amount is influenced by many factors including the thermal oxidizer operating temperature, residence time, sulfur concentration, amount of excess air, and the presence of catalytic oxides and metal catalysts in the fuel. Literature suggests that even a well-performing thermal oxidizer still converts 1 to 5% of SO2 into SO3. Given the numerous factors influencing the formation of SO3¬, most designers select a conservative estimate of SO3 conversion, even when actual SO3 emissions have been measured, as variations in operation can generate substantially higher conversion.

Once formed in the thermal oxidizer, SO3 reacts with water in the downstream quencher to form sulfuric acid (H2SO4) by the reaction:

SO3(g) + H2O(l) => H2SO4(l)

At temperatures below 350°F, H2SO4 condenses into submicron liquid droplets which are difficult to remove because of their small size. Aerosol droplets pass through a quencher and packed bed absorber. A separate control device is needed for sulfuric acid removal that is suitable for submicron droplets.

Click on the link below to download the IT3/HWC conference paper to learn about “Technology Solutions for Sulfuric Acid Formation and Removal in Liquid Waste and Waste Gas Thermal Oxidizers”. The paper evaluates and compares candle filters versus wet electrostatic precipitators (WESPs) for H2SO4 removal in these types of applications.

Download Literature

Topics: particulate control, Scrubbers, SO2 Scrubber, wet electrostatic precipitators, Acid Gas, Incinerator Scrubber, SO3 Aerosol

Sewage Sludge Incinerator Mercury Control Scrubber

Posted by Andy Bartocci on Mon, May 13, 2019 @ 01:53 PM

A municipal waste water treatment plant operates a 2,750 lb/hr fluid bed sewage sludge incinerator (SSI). The Mecury Control Renderingincinerator had been shut down due to safety issues with the granulated activated carbon (GAC) mercury control scrubber. The plant sought expert help to evaluate and recommend a technology solution to replace the GAC and to get the SSI back in operation.

Based on extensive waste incineration gas cleaning experience, the facility contracted Envitech to evaluate the process, make recommendations, and implement a solution.

Envitech reviewedMercury Control Scrubber available literature and data to establish a conservative but justifiable design inlet concentration with sufficient capacity to meet a more conservative design condition without structural changes to the equipment.

An additional Envitech study compared W.L. Gore sorbent polymer catalyst (SPC) mercury control modules to sulfur impregnated activated carbon taking into account capital and operating cost, mercury removal efficiency, safety, and performance risk. The facility implemented Envitech’s recommendation for an Envitech SBC mercury control scrubber. A vessel constructed of fiber reinforced plastic (FRP) provides excellent corrosion resistance and low cost. An inlet heater duct with controls optimizes temperature for maximum performance. An internal duct with bottom outlet near grade direct connects to the existing stack. The vessel has extra capacity to double the number of SPC modules to meet the conservative inlet concentration if needed.

The equipment was commissioned in December, 2018. Inlet and outlet stack tests confirm greater than 96.4% removal and emissions less than 5% of the MACT limit for existing FB SSI. The Envitech SPC mercury control scrubber provides an economic, high performance, safe solution for continued incineration operation.  It can be applied to other types of applications that require mercury control downstream of wet scrubber equipment.  It provides a worthwhile technology to consider for mercury control.

Click on the link below to download a sewage sludge incinerator (SSI) mercury control scrubber case study and other SSI incinerator scrubbing literature.

 

Download Literature

Topics: Scrubbers, MACT Standards, Incinerator Scrubber

Ozone Injection for NOx Control on Medical Waste Incinerators

Posted by Andy Bartocci on Tue, Oct 30, 2018 @ 09:39 AM

Early this year I posted about achieving ultra-low emission limits for medical waste incinerator scrubbers.Med waste incinerator scrubber Front  An example was given for a captive incinerator at the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) in Galveston, TX. It’s one of the only systems in the United States permitted as a “new” medical waste incinerator according to the EPA HMIWI (hospital, medical, and infectious waste incinerator) MACT standard. This standard has the most challenging emission limits found in industry today. That is because in 2009 the EPA completed a source review and revised the standard based on a MACT-on-MACT analysis.  Data used to set limits for each pollutant was individually based on waste feed and not incinerator/scrubber technology performance.  This resulted in emission limit reductions for lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), and dioxins/furans (D/F) that were orders of magnitude below the previous standard and below the capability of installed equipment.  The impact of the new standard is discussed in greater detail in a 2013 blog post and corresponding paper from the Air & Waste Management Association (AWMA) International Conference on Thermal Treatment Technologies and Hazardous Waste Combustors (IT3/HWC)..
Medical waste incinerator Scrubber add-on controlsExisting incinerators needed to be upgraded with add-on controls to meet the new standard.  New incinerators need air pollution control equipment capable of extraordinarily high removal efficiency for particulate, Pb, Cd, and D/F.  A new medium sized incinerator between 200 to 500 lb/hr capacity, has the additional challenge of meeting NOx.  A medical waste incinerator can be tuned to a NOx limit of about 130 ppmv.  The MACT standard limit for a new medium sized medical waste incinerator was set at 67 ppmv which means NOx abatement is required to guarantee compliance.

Envitech is building two scrubber systems to treat exhaust gases from two new medical waste incinerators that will treat captive waste at a research facility.  The incinerators are permitted as new medium size incinerators which must meet the 67 ppmv NOx limit. The scrubbers have an equipment arrangement for meeting emission standards for PM, HCl, SO2, Pb, Cd, Hg, D/F, and opacity.  The schematic below shows the components of the gas cleaning system. The quencher is used to cool the gas to saturation and remove large particulate. The packed bed condenser/absorber sub-cools the gas and removes acid gases with caustic injection. The Venturi scrubber removes particulate and the majority of heavy metals. The gas then passes through additional polishing controls to meet the ultra-low emission limits for Pd, Cd, Hg, and D/F. The polishing equipment includes a re-heat duct followed by a filter and carbon bed adsorber.Med waste scrubber PFD

NOx removal is achieved by injecting ozone injection into the quencher outlet. The sizIMG_1032 Backside 1e of the condenser/absorber is increased to provide sufficient residence time for ozone-NOx reactions to occur.  Ozone is highly selective for NOx relative to other combustion products.   The NOx is rapidly converted to water soluble species. NO and O3 react to form NO2 and O2.  NO2 and O2 react to form N2O5 and O2. N2O5 and water react to form 2HNO3 which is readily absorbed with caustic solution.

Envitech used it’s rectangular scrubber design for the condenser absorber. To maintain a modular design and make it shippable.  The vessel was flanged connected and shipped in two pieces. The scrubber system otherwise looks like a typical medical waste incinerator scrubber except the condenser/absorber is double the height compared to systems that do not require NOx control.

The system has been built and shipped to the site. The major components are installed at the facility.  Envitech will deliver a water treatment system in 2019 to treat the scrubber effluent before it is discharged to the facilities main water treatment system.  System Start-up is scheduled for 2020.

Click on the link below to download a case study and other medical waste incinerator scrubbing literature.

 Download Literature

Topics: Scrubbers, Acid Gas, MACT Standards, Medical Waste Incinerator Scrubber, Incinerator Scrubber, NOx

Merrill Crowe Refining Furnace SO2 Scrubber

Posted by Andy Bartocci on Thu, Oct 25, 2018 @ 03:02 PM

There are many applications that require packed bed absorbers for scrubbing SO2. Some applications Refining furnace SO2 Scrubberpreviously blogged about include refinery sulfur recovery unit tail gas treatment units (SRU/TGTU), geothermal power generation, and waste oil re-refining to name a few.  Another SO2 scrubber example is gas cleaning equipment for a mineral processing application to recover gold and silver from mine sites with low grade ore.   Discovered and patented in the early 1900 by Charles Merrill and later refined by Thomas Crowe, the Merrill-Crowe process is a common separation technique for removing gold and silver from a cyanide solution using zinc dust.  Gold and silver precipitate (concentrate) is the product of the Merrill-Crowe process.  Furnaces are then used to recover ingots from smelting Merrill-Crowe precipitate.  Fluxes are mixed with the precipitate to bring impurities to the surface. The precious metals settles down and can then be easily removed.

Envitech is currently building an SO2 scrubber to treat the exhaust gases from a melting furnace for a South American precious metals refinery mining project.  Furnace off-gases are in the 300oF to 500oF range and contain particulate and SO2.  A bag-house removes particulate from the gas before passing downstream to the packed bed absorber for SO2 removal.  Gas is first cooled to saturation in an evaporative quencher using re-circulated water. In the case of a pump failure, an emergency spray nozzle provides an independent source of water controlled by a thermocouple.  Water that has not evaporated flows from the quencher into the packed bed absorber sump. Gas from the quencher enters the bottom of the absorber and travels vertically upward through a packed bed.  Recirculated water is sprayed over the packed bed and mixes with the counter current gas.  A dilute solution of plant-supplied sodium hydroxide is metered into the scrubber recirculation line to neutralize acid gases and is controlled by pH of the absorber sump liquid.  The scrubbing water is collected in the sump and is re-circulated to the top of the packed bed and to the quencher. A blowdown stream is taken from the recirculation line to purge the system of reaction products. After the packed bed, the gas passes through an entrainment separator to remove water droplets entrained in the gas during scrubbing. The gas then exits the scrubber and is exhausted to atmosphere through an ID fan and stack.

The scrubber scope of supply includes a quencher, packed bed absorber, instruments, control system, recirculation pump, piping, valves, and fittings, ID fan, and metering pump. The unit will be pre-assembled to the fullest extent possible with pre-mounted instruments pre-wired to a control panel.  The assembly will be broken down as necessary for shipment and packaged for export to South America.  Bilingual submittals are provided for the O&M manuals and engineering submittals.  The scrubber will be delivered and started up in Q1 of 2019.

Click on the link below for a case study on the Merrill-Crowe Refining Furnace SO2 Scrubber and a packed bed absorber cut sheet.

 Download Literature

Topics: Scrubbers, SO2 Scrubber, Acid Gas

Horizontal Venturi Scrubber for Particulate Control

Posted by Andy Bartocci on Mon, Oct 22, 2018 @ 12:21 PM

Venturi scrubbers are mechanical impaction devices that are used to control particulate on a wide range of applications. These include medical and hazardous waste incineration, potash drying, sewage sludge incineration and processing, coal drying, mineral wool manufacturing, and copper roasting to name a few.  In one of my last blog posts I discussed a Venturi collision scrubber used to treat exhaust fumes of a Banbury mixer for rubber compounding.  The Envitech collision scrubber is used in several Goodyear Tire manufacturing facilities around the world.   


Venturi scrubber

A recent new application is a horizontal Venturi scrubber for an aggregate asphalt drum dyer.  The asphalt process is semi-stationary operating at fixed locations for several months at a time. The process is periodically broken down and moved to new locations for operation.  The horizontal arrangement makes the horizontal Venturi scrubber an ideal solution for mobile applications.  The equipment package is transportable on a single flatbed with only minor disassembly required for shipment and installation.  The equipment is mounted onto a skid with pre-assembled piping and wiring to facilitate equipment mobility. 

Particles are captured in the horizontal Venturi scrubber through a process of impaction by water droplets injected into the Venturi throat.  A fraction of particulate laden water becomes entrained in the gas which has a droplet size distribution.  The droplets are removed from the gas by a mist eliminator.   There are two pathways for particles to escape capture by the scrubber. The first is penetration.  Smaller particles lacking the mass for impaction penetrate through the scrubber.  The second is through carry over of particulate laden water droplets.  Droplet capture efficiency, or mist elimination, therefore impacts scrubber efficiency and overall plant emissions.

The horizontal Venturi scrubber uses a damper blade and actuator to maintain constant pressure drop across a wide range of gas flows.  A high efficiency chevron mist eliminator removes particulate laden droplets before the gas exits the scrubber.  A chevron mist eliminator removes greater than 99.9% of water droplets down to 27 microns with less than 0.25 inches W.C. of pressure drop.  By comparison, a cyclonic separator requires several inches W.C. of pressure drop to remove 98% of 27 microns droplets.   The advantages of a chevron mist eliminator are higher performance, larger turn down ratio, and lower pressure drop.

Envitech is currently building two new horizontal Venturi scrubbers sized for 45,000 acfm each for a peat drying operation. The compact design allows the scrubber to be easily installed inside a building. The high level of pre-assembly and lower profile reduces installation time and improves maintenance access for plant personnel.  The horizontal Venturi scrubber can be a cost effective alternative to many processes that use a typical vertical arrangement.

Click on the link below to download Venturi scrubber literature.

 Download Literature

Topics: particulate control, Venturi scrubbers, Scrubbers